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T. DEWITT TAYLOR MIDDLE-HIGH
100 E. Washington Ave
Pierson, Florida 32180
(386) 749-6800
    Standardized Testing

     

    End Of Course Exams

    FCAT Explorer

    Please click on the FCAT Explorer link for important FCAT information
     
    Please contact our Media Specialist, Donna Braswell, 386-749-6800 extension 23733, for  Login and Password information. 

    FCAT Writes

    In 2012, the scoring criteria for FCAT Writing will be expanded. In addition to the elements of focus, organization, support, and conventions described in the current rubrics, scoring decisions will include expanded expectations regarding the following: (1) increased attention to the correct use of standard English conventions and (2) ***increased attention to the quality of details, requiring use of relevant, logical, and plausible support, rather than contrived statistical claims or unsubstantiated generalities.  

    ***Scoring will include increased attention to the quality of details, requiring use of relevant, logical, and plausible support, rather than contrived statistical claims or unsubstantiated generalities. The quality of the support depends on word choice, specificity, depth, relevance, and thoroughness. Responses earning high scores must include specific and relevant supporting details that clarify the meaning, i.e., the point of the paragraph or the central theme of the response. Rote memorization or overuse of compositional techniques, such as rhetorical questions, implausible statistics, or pretentious language is not the expectation for quality writing at any grade level.
     
    Achieving Effective Writing
     
    The best way to teach writing is to engage students in the writing process. This recursive process includes planning, writing, revising, and editing.

    As students become more proficient, the amount of time spent on each step in the process may shorten, and the necessity for teacher involvement should lessen.
     
    Description of Effective Writing
     
    A well-written piece can best be described as incorporating elements of writing in such a way that a reader can experience the writer's intended meaning, understand the writer's premise, and accept or reject the writer's point of view. Effective writing:

    • is focused on the topic and does not contain extraneous or loosely related information;
    • has an organizational pattern that enables the reader to follow the flow of ideas because it contains a beginning, middle, and end and uses transitional devices;
    • contains supporting ideas that are developed through the use of details, examples, vivid language, and mature word choice; and
    • follows the conventions of standard written English (i.e., punctuation, capitalization, and spelling) and has variation in sentence structure.